New ways to help people with MS combat heat related fatigue

Dr Ollie Jay

The University of Sydney, NSW

| Better treatments | Social And Applied Research | Project | 2018 | Investigator Led Research |
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Summary

Approximately 90% of Australians with MS are affected by the heat. This can lead to heat-induced or related fatigue. Heat-related fatigue can result in loss of employment, and increases the cost of living.

Recently, Dr ollie Jay and his team have shown that if certain parts of the body are cooled, the sensation of fatigue can be reduced, allowing physical activity in the heat to be performed for longer periods of time. In this project he aims to build on these findings and develop simple and novel interventions for preventing heat-related fatigue in people with MS.

Dr Jay will assess if swirling cold fluids in the mouth is enough, or do they need to be swallowed? If particular skin sites can be targeted with surface cooling materials to reduce heat-related fatigue, and if methanol can be rinsed in the mouth or applied to the skin to reduce heat-related fatigue.

The results of these experiments will lead to the development of novel cooling interventions that are simple and inexpensive. Ultimately, the findings of this study will not only help people with MS maintain their functional capacity for longer during exposure to the heat, but also help us better understand the underlying mechanisms associated with heat sensitivity in MS.

Updated: 11 January 2018

Updated: 05 January, 2018

Investigator

Co-investigator

  • Associate Professor Michael Barnett
  • Associate Professor Scott Davis
  • Dr Davide Filingeri
  • Associate Professor Anthony Carlsen

Grant Awarded

  • Project Grant

Total Funding

  • $176,000

Duration

  • 3 years over 2018 - 2020

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